Transport in South Africa: Go-Concierge answers your questions

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Many questions have been asked about transport logistics during the World Cup. Go-Concierge is offering a simple, safe travel solution for fans worldcupsalogo001visiting the event in South Africa this June. And if you book by the end of March, we’ll give you 10% off your first booking. Use the booking code GCEarlyBird to secure your discount. 

How easy will it be to get around South Africa during the World Cup? 

Somewhere between very and not at all depending on your research and planning. South Africa’s transport infrastructure is among the best in Africa. The government has invested billions of rand into upgrading the system. But standards are still variable. On match days and non-match days, the country’s roads, railways and airports will be working at the top of their capacity. Geography is another factor. South Africa is vast. Johannesburg is 909 miles (1473km) from Cape Town and Cape Town is 951 miles (1532km) from Durban. To put those distances into perspective, it’s a mere 784 miles (1263km) from London to Madrid and 890 miles (1431km) from London to Rome. So what are your options? 

Trains

Not for people in a hurry. While it’s possible to train it between the host cities and within some of the host cities, the sheer size of South Africa makes journey times prohibitive. The trip from Johannesburg to Cape Town, for example, takes around 27 hours. 

Services are none too regular and only two of the stadiums are linked to the rail network.

What’s more, conditions can be on the earthy side and you might not feel 100% safe.
That said, phase one of Johannesburg’s multi-billion rand Gautrain link is scheduled to go live between OR Tambo Airport, Sandton and Midrand in time for the tournament. Watch this space! 

Planes

OK for getting between the host cities. Especially if plans for all-night shuttles take off. But the fares haven’t been set yet and you’ve still got to get from the airport to your accommodation or the stadium. 

Automobiles

Private cars

Assuming the supply of rental vehicles doesn’t dry up, travelling by car is relatively straightforward – but not cheap. Even if you can find a rental car, navigating unfamiliar and roads is never easy. Especially after dark when you’ve had a drink or two. As for match day parking, think Oxford Street on Christmas Eve. 
 
Taxis

Variable. 

Taking a taxi in anywhere involves some degree of risk. They aren’t always roadworthy, the drivers aren’t always licensed or insured – and they’re usually strangers. 

When they’re good, South African taxis are among the best you’ll find. When they’re bad, they’re four-wheeled coffins. 

But the comparison is academic because there’s a good chance that there simply won’t be enough taxis to go round. 

Buses

An interesting one. Some host cities have invested in whole new bus fleets for the World Cup and the authorities nationwide are working hard to upgrade bus routes and facilities. But if you find first world bus travel an endurance test, you’re unlikely to enjoy South Africa bus travel.

Coaches could be an option for getting between the cities – provided you’ve got the time, patience and plenty of reading material. Think National Express and triple the fun. 

The smart option

Go-Concierge’s pristine Toyota Quantums are the safest and most secure way to get into and around your host city on match days and non-img-quantummatch days. 

Our drivers and concierges know the difference between a bar and a shebeen and they know how to get you home – wherever the party starts and whenever it finishes. 

And as proud South Africans, they’re on hand to show you the attractions that make our country such a brilliant travel destination.

We’re based in Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg and Port Elizabeth. But we’re also looking at plans to take in matches in other centres.

Check out the packages we’re offering. Once you’ve done a cost-benefit comparison with the other options on offer, we’re sure you’ll agree that our service is the only way to go.

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