Levy explains why Spurs’ 15-year Nike kit deal is not comparable with Premier League rivals

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Tottenham Hotspur Stadium
Dom Le Roy

Tottenham Hotspur confirmed last year that they had agreed a new long-term kit agreement with Nike.

The deal with the US sportswear giant runs until 2033 and is thought to be one of the longest deals with a football club in Nike’s history.

According to The Sun, the deal is worth £30million to the North London club per year.

Spurs chairman Daniel Levy was asked at a recent meeting with the Tottenham Hotspur Supporter’s Trust why the agreement seemed to be a low financial amount compared to recent shirt deals which Premier League rivals had been quoted in the media.

Manchester City signed a new 10-year deal with Puma in February which will earn the City Football Group (CFG) up to £65m a season over the next decade (Telegraph).  Arsenal are entering a kit agreement with Adidas next season which is worth £60m-a-year over five years (Daily Mail).

Levy revealed that it was difficult to compare Tottenham’s kit deal to some of their rivals as some of them had also sold their merchandising rights, while the club prefer to keep hold of theirs.

Meeting minutes from the THST read: 

  • DL [Daniel Levy] explained how other Clubs sold their merchandise rights (store and licensing) too, but that we preferred to control that ourselves so comparing those deals was not comparing like for like
  • Realism was also needed that other clubs sell more shirts than THFC, which has an impact on the fee
  • SB [Simon Bamber – club director] explained that the numbers reported in the press were usually inaccurate with some clubs including potential bonus amounts

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3 COMMENTS

  1. The “rival”clubs sell more shirts because they are famous all over the world after winning in the recent past titles and trophies.
    Many people want to belong to the winning side.

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